5 (Non-Religious) Reasons To Stop Watching Porn

Having grown up before it was everywhere and it not having a place in my life, I was indifferent to Internet pornography until my son was born in 2013. That’s when I started to notice how pervasive the sex industry was, how it was being aimed at younger and younger boys, and how easily my son could become ensnared in a downward spiral of sexual depravity masquerading as normal psychosexual development. Since then, I’ve learned a lot about pornography and the effects it has on the brain. Many people still mistake the crusade against pornography for a purely religious battle, but like cigarettes, pollution, and cheap public restroom toilet paper, porn is detrimental to everyone.

  1. Porn only imitates intimacy, and not well. Contrary to popular belief, those of us in the anti-porn industry are not railing against this cultural phenomenon because we’re prudish or because we don’t enjoy sex. We love it so much, in fact, that seeing an entire generation growing up where their main source of sexual education is derived from porn ignites within us a fire of righteous indignation. Sex as we experience it is one of the great things about being human, while porn adds feces, urine, torture, and other embellishments to distract the viewer from the fact that pornography isn’t representative of sex. Don’t be fooled.
  2. Frequent Pornography Use Has Been Tied to Increased Objectification[1]. In porn, women are sex objects whose main reason for existence is to get a man off. It’s seeped so deeply into the subconscious of our society that there are men who say that they should be given women to have sex with, because having to deal with getting a woman’s permission to have sex with them eats up their time and is ‘embarrassing’ when they refuse. Not only do some now feel entitled to have sex with whoever they want, but they’re viewing sex as a purely physical act. Sex is about more than just a physical need, and porn is taking that away from us. Our pornified culture means having to say, “my eyes are up here” more for women, and people of all genders confused as to what the deeper meaning of sex is.
  3. It’s Hard to Have Sex When You’re Not Hard. Ah, Porn-Induced Erectile Dysfunction. Years ago, ED was a middle-aged man’s crucible, but as Internet Pornography has blown up, suddenly otherwise healthy 17-year-old men are unable to get or maintain an erection.
  4. You Can’t Prove Consent.[2] There are numerous accounts of porn stars who, though they’d gotten into the industry on purpose, found themselves in situations they stayed in out of fear, and those are just some of the people you see in porn. Pornographies can also star human trafficking victims, some of which aren’t even of age. They’re coerced into acting like they’re enjoying it, so you can’t even tell which porns feature paid actresses and which ones are exploiting slaves.
  5. Pornography has gotten weird.[3] Nothing is more representative of how far down the rabbit hole we’ve fallen in our dance with porn than the current trends in pornography. Thanks to the escalating nature of porn and porn addiction, porn now frequently highlights bodily fluids, torture, murder, interspecies, cartoon, gape, and incest-where does it end? The more deviance we allow in pornography, the harder it is to not only retain (or in some cases, regain) our ability to be intimate with our partners but to acclimate back into normal societal roles and pastimes, and even our careers, with it becoming commonplace for employees to be fired over using pornography at work.[4] There are many indicators that pornography addiction is real but not being able to stop long enough to do your job is one whose implications resonate with most of us.

The existence of pornography affects us all. Even those who don’t consume it have had their lives touched by it: the sexualization of our society stems from and feeds into the porn machine. If we want children to retain their innocence, stop kidnapping for sex trafficking, and revive sexual intimacy between people, and not projections on a screen, then we have to be honest: porn doesn’t fit in that world.


[1] Nita Belles, In Our Backyard Human Trafficking in America and What We Can Do To Stop It, (Grand Rapids, Baker Books, 2015) 192.

[2] Belles, 101-102;104-105;114.

[3] “Pornhub’s 2016 Year in Review”. Pornhub Insights. https://www.pornhub.com/insights/2016-year-in-review (11/1/17)

[4] Michael Leahy, Porn at Work Exposing the Office’s #1 Addiction, (Chicago, Northfield Publishing, 2009)

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